March is Poison Prevention Awareness Month

National Poison Prevention Week is March 16 – 22, 2014, and while much of the focus is on educating parents of small children, Pet Poison Helpline says to remember that pets can be just as vulnerable!

 

Dogs and cats have insatiable curiosity and tend to get into trouble investigating new things by licking or tasting them. This is because some foods, medications and other household items that are safe for humans can be devastating to pets.

 

The veterinary and toxicology experts at Pet Poison Helpline offer two important tips for keeping pets safe:

 

Keep Dangerous Items out of Reach


Most homes have hidden dangers in medicine cabinets, purses, kitchens and garages. Pet owners should familiarize themselves with things poisonous to dogs and cats, and keep them stowed out of reach. The best resource for information, including a comprehensive list items dangerous to pets, is Pet Poison Helpline's website and mobile app.


Stock a Pet First Aid Kit


In the event of an unfortunate mishap, a properly stocked Pet First Aid Kit can contribute to a much happier ending. Here are recommended contents:

 

For Potentially Poisoned Pets:

  • Phone number for Pet Poison Helpline: 1-800-213-6680
  • Hydrogen peroxide 3 percent used to induce vomiting in dogs– make sure it's not expired
  • Oral dosing syringe or turkey baster – for administering hydrogen peroxide
  • Teaspoon/tablespoon set – for measuring appropriate amount of hydrogen peroxide
  • Liquid hand dish washing detergent, such as Dawn or Palmolive
  • Rubber or latex gloves
  • Triple antibiotic ointment, like Neosporin™
  • Vitamin E (a small container of oil or several gel caps)
  • Diphenhydramine tablets 25mg – with NO other combination ingredients
  • Ophthalmic saline solution or artificial tears
  • Can of tuna packed in water or tasty canned pet food
  • Sweet electrolyte-containing beverage
  • Corn syrup (1/4 cup)
  • Vegetable oil (1/2 cup)

 

For Injured Pets:

  • Phone number for local emergency veterinary hospital
  • Gauze roll and pads
  • Medical tape
  • Ruler or other rigid material for splint
  • Scissors and tweezers
  • Thermometer and sterile lubricant, like KY™ jelly
  • Rubber or latex gloves
  • Towel or blanket
  • Muzzle (for dogs)
  • Cone collar (for cats)
  • Triple antibiotic ointment, like Neosporin™
  • Ophthalmic saline solution – make sure it doesn't contain any cleaners or soaps

Store the items in a plastic or other waterproof container, and in a location out of the reach of pets. Especially when poisoning is suspected, it's imperative to call Pet Poison Helpline or your veterinarian prior to administering any therapies at home. They will first help you determine if the item ingested was poisonous to begin with, and will then advise what the treatment or antidote is and whether or not inducing vomiting is recommended.

 

"It's really important to be wary of 'home remedies' found on the Internet when treating a potentially poisoned pet," said Ahna Brutlag, DVM, MS, DABT, DABVT and associate director of veterinary services at Pet Poison Helpline. "We hear it all – pet owners who, after Googling their situation, hope to resolve it by giving the pet milk, burnt toast, raw eggs, peanut butter, or table salt. These remedies simply don't work and can cause additional undue stress for the pet and owner."

 

 Source: Pet Poison Helpline: http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/

Where to Find Us:

Wahington Pike Veterinary Hospital
3400 Mill Road
Knoxville, TN 37924
    Directions


Phone: 865-523-6886
 

Office Hours:
Monday 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

Tuesday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Wed - Friday 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

Saturday 8:00 am - Noon

 

No Show Policy:

Missed appointment - $25

Missed surgery - $100

 

 

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